Mar. 18, 2022
Date:  Friday, March 18, 2022   Fork Union Military Academy collected three impressive AMCSUS awards the Association of Military Colleges and Schools of the United States announced prior to Spring Break. The Academy placed first in the High School Writing Competition, Middle School PT Challenge and Middle School Drill Competition. AMCSUS PT Challenge This competition […]...
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Date: 
Friday, March 18, 2022

 

Fork Union Military Academy collected three impressive AMCSUS awards the Association of Military Colleges and Schools of the United States announced prior to Spring Break. The Academy placed first in the High School Writing Competition, Middle School PT Challenge and Middle School Drill Competition.

AMCSUS PT Challenge

This competition reviewed the highest overall scores for the Physical Assessment, which consisted of 1-minute maximum set of push-ups, 1-minute maximum set of sit-ups, and a 1.5-mile run. Our Middle School cadets, once again, took first place, with an average score of 93.1 points out of a possible 100, outperforming the other 25 college preparatory schools. Below are the names of the participants.

  • Ryan Barone
  • Clayton Dunaway
  • William Stimson
  • Aidan Good
  • Travis Shepard

AMCSUS Drill Competition

This competition was graded by staff and faculty members from Senior Military Colleges. Fork Union cadets were in competition with the 25 other College Preparatory schools within the Association of Military Colleges and Schools of the United States (AMCSUS). Our Middle School cadets took first place, conducting a competition that consisted of 31 drill movements, which took approximately 5 minutes to complete. Below is the names of the participants.

Unit Leader

  • Travis Shepard

1st Squad

  • Nicholas Coleman – Squad Leader
  • Eugene Belozerov
  • Niv Patel
  • Miles Graybill
  • Vu Tran
  • Everett Mitchell

2nd Squad

  • Travis Tran – Squad Leader
  • Aidan Good
  • Theophilus Aberra
  • Maddox Beaulieu
  • Riley Belden
  • William Stimson

3rd Squad

  • Michael Johnson – Squad Leader
  • Colton Childers
  • Val Kelestyn
  • Nigel Asamoah
  • Iker Serrano
  • Nico Brown

AMCSUS Writing Assignment

New to AMCSUS this year, the Writing Competition was established to encourage academic writing skills to collect, share insights and research related to military school education. Cadets provided a single page paper on any aspect of military education (e.g., benefits, challenges, experiences). Junior Jackson Pretus took first place outperforming the other 25 college preparatory schools with his submission below:

Forging Leaders through Military Education

The most critical function of military education is the development of camaraderie and team building among the students. Detractors of military education may argue it is overly rigid and hierarchical. Still, the military educational institution provides an unmatched process of maturing young men to assume various roles within a chain of command and work effectively with their peers to complete tasks or solve problems. It challenges cadets and holds them strictly accountable for their actions, creating a culture in which cadets will need to work together and learn to rely on one another to thrive. The friendships developed within the leadership structure are valued bonds in young men’s lives and teach them to navigate and work in the hierarchy of the real world.

When cadets are first introduced to the military educational environment, they typically enter it alone and naïve. They are surrounded by others with potentially different values, religions, cultures, or ethnicities. Yet, when the cadet completes their military education, they will have learned to work effectively with, and even befriend their peers from differing backgrounds. (Farnell, 2016.) Everyone is presented with the same challenges, standards, and routines. They are pitted against and with each other and expected to compete to be the best in their duties. Cadets will play numerous different roles within a chain of command and learn both skills and weaknesses while also playing on the strengths of their team. (Keith, 2012.) The result is a well-adjusted community of fire-forged friends who together are ready to lead and succeed in the world.

Consider the contrast between the development from a military school and the maturing process at a typical high school. The cadet undergoes a much more demanding experience than the average student but enjoys a much smaller, closer brotherhood that is better equipped to cater to needs and interests. The all-boys environment of many military schools allows cadets to express themselves freely, work, develop friendships, and be guided by concerned faculty without the distracting influence of romance. Paired with the exceptional opportunity for fellowship, the greater interest of instructors in creating leaders prepared to lead and serve others creates a student body better suited for the rigors of life than their counterparts.

In conclusion, the military school offers a challenging, yet uniquely rewarding education that can transform and mature young men into influential leaders. However, it does not lose sight of the importance of socializing the cadet. Military education instead uses the trials it presents to bring otherwise distant boys into strong teams that teach them the value of valuable and lasting friendships. With these skills attained, the men produced by military education are unparalleled in their readiness for the tests of life.

Congratulations, gentlemen!

 

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